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Roads Policing

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ROADS POLICING

FACTS AND FIGURES

• Over the last 5 years casualty figures in Lancashire have reduced significantly, with 16 per cent fewer people killed or seriously injured on the county’s roads in 2013 compared to 2008.

• There were 33 fatal collisions in 2013

• In the same period, the number of children killed or seriously injured has dropped by 38 per cent.

• In 2013, action was taken against 3198 motorists for driving whilst using a mobile phone in the county and against 4345 for not wearing a seatbelt.

• 37962 motorists were found speeding on the county’s roads in 2013

The Road Policing Unit is responsible for policing the county’s roads – ultimately reducing casualties and catching criminals.

Our aim is to educate as many offending motorists as possible in order to change their driving behavior.  In 2013, 32718 motorists attended a driver education course as an alternative to prosecution.

As well as targeted patrols on specific routes, officers run local operations in areas where residents have raised concerns and use new technology such as ANPR to monitor vehicles using the county’s road network. This includes actively targeting criminals travelling through and across Lancashire, such as motorists involved in serious and organised crime and terrorism or those who are driving anti-socially or putting other road users in jeopardy.

This involves actively targeting criminals travelling through and across Lancashire, which includes motorists involved in serious and organised crime and terrorism as well as those driving anti-socially or putting other road users in jeopardy.

Chief Inspector Debbie Howard, from the Roads Policing Unit, said: “Our priorities are to reduce collisions, target criminals and increase confidence.
“Casualty reduction forms an important part of that, and we work to reduce the number of people killed or seriously injured on Lancashire’s roads through engagement, education, enforcement and engineering.  The engagement and education element is very important, and that’s done through officers working with our partners, going to schools and colleges to deliver educational packages and speaking to the children and teenagers about road and cycle safety. And when people are found speeding, we give them the option to attend an educational course as an alternative to prosecution or a fixed penalty notice as we would want to change driver behaviour. We educate around 25,000 drivers a year in Lancashire, and we have more chance of changing behaviour through that than a fixed penalty notice.

“Our partners in local councils and the fire service also help us out with education, but enforcement falls solely on the police.

“Roads policing officers are out on a daily basis looking for people who are committing offences such as drink-driving, not wearing a seatbelt – which is a contributing factor in around 25 per cent of fatal crashes – speeding and mobile phone use, which is something we are seeing more and more of in collisions which result in fatal or life-changing injuries. There is always a reason why a collision occurs, whether it is one of the above – which we call the “fatal four” – driver behaviour or a medical problem, and there is a direct link between police enforcement and casualty reduction.

“While roads policing officers are on enforcement operations they are also looking for prolific criminals using the roads. Officers will get involved in pursuits where necessary, but these are all carefully managed to minimise risk to the public. Where there are dangerous people on the roads we have a duty to stop them.”